English

VillaTokyo

 

月曜日が日曜日の場所で

11-18 November 2011


 


 
 


 

11-18 November 2011

Collateral Exhibition

Film (curated by Łukasz Ronduda)

Film  (curated by Łukasz Ronduda)

Paweł Kwiek, Video-breath, 1978 (fragment)

The intersection of art and film is currently a hot topic. … The screening of ‘Conceptual Talking Movies – Mental Projections’ was preceded by Paweł Kwiek’s presentation of his already classic cinematic performance from 1972 titled ‘The Commentary’. The artist stood before the audience with the intention, as he had himself announced, of introducing his own film about a boy, a girl and the obstacles hindering their love. … Though there was no projection on the screen, we soon came to realize that there was something in the room that one could call a peculiar reception of the film told and that we ourselves were the authors of the images speeding across our imagination evoked by what Kwiek was saying. … Once Kwiek’s performance was over, another veteran of conceptual art, Andrzej Dłużniweski, entered the stage presenting a talk-based piece from 1975, which was similar in form but different in its cinematic expression. The work was entitled ‘Sentences about Numbers, People and Space’. … Pointing at a blank and barely visible screen in the cinema auditorium, the artist began slowly, ‘A pale grey screen. A miniature man is balancing. A grey silhouette slightly darker than the space enclosed on the screen. He roams around, disappears beyond the screen edge, peeks back in, withdraws. …’ Dłużniewski continued his psychoactive cinematic tale for some twenty minutes. The artist’s intention was for the mental projection that was unfolding at the level of the audience’s imagination to produce an ideally materialized conceptual work of art, which can only become the purest idea – ‘the naked life of art’ – when it liberates itself from the author’s intention and has not yet been imagined or consumed by us, the viewers. ... then Jan Świdziński entered the stage to present his piece from 1975, ‘Film/No Film. From the Logic of Incomplete Realities.’ … Świdziński kept awakening the audience from a cinematic mental projection by indicating concrete and real places and events taking place in the cinema, ‘an empty screen, an empty screen, an old artist, saying something to the microphone, it is getting lighter, and lighter, the lights are illuminating, the people are getting up, the seats are slamming, people are leaving, the old artist is left by himself, the old artist, to whom nobody wants to listen.’

Excerpt from a book by Łukasz Gorczyca and Łukasz Ronduda,
‘Half Empty. The Life and Art of Oskar Dawicki’, Warsaw 2010.


 


 

11-18 November 2011

Collateral Exhibition

Navid Nuur

Navid Nuur

Navid Nuur, Study for Tentacle Thought Series, 2006-2011, wire, neon tubes. Courtesy of Plan B Cluj/Berlin and Martin van Zomeren, Amsterdam

When Navid Nuur (b.1976, Teheran) talks about his work, he often uses terms like ‘clean’ or ‘pure’ or occasionally even ‘warm’. The way in which he relates to material, the space around him and his observations on this could almost be described as devout. Through his attention to detail and the careful coordination of the various components of a work or exhibition, the spectator becomes a participant in an ‘internal’ world. Nuur’s work – which at first glance appears to be developed very conceptually – reveals a highly personal approach to image in which the presentation of the question plays a central role. How a certain phrase requires a specific structure for example or how variations in tones of red and blue can evoke different shades of purple. What Nuur shares with the conceptual artists of the sixties is the relationship between concept and form. However, in his work form is not simply the result of the idea but develops by way of a subjective programme of requirements or rules in which intuition plays a key role. Navid Nuur says: ‘it is a certainty based on feeling that I can only explain later on. However, if you have to rationalize a work in order to justify it, it becomes conceptually dead.’ He uses concepts that are related to a temporary interim situation that places his work between the spectator and what is often an abstract phenomenon such as light, energy, air or ‘remaining/residual space’. Nuur’s formal idiom and the meaning he attributes to a work are therefore purely part of a process. His work is in fact a depiction of this process and is therefore transitory in almost all of its manifestations. Consequently, it would be better to describe the installations, drawings and objects he creates as ‘thought models’. This is why he prefers to refer to his works as ‘interimodules’, where the word ‘module’ refers to the way of thinking and the actual conceptualising of it and ‘interim’ to the temporary ‘between’, the process aspect of his work.

Thibaut Verhoeven


 


 

11-18 November 2011

Collateral Exhibition

Art Vending Machine – Maryna Tomaszewska (Presented by Witryna)

Art Vending Machine – Maryna Tomaszewska (Presented by Witryna)

One of the most common elements of contemporary Japanese culture is the vending machine, from which you can buy just about anything (from an iPod and an umbrella to fresh eggs and potted flowers). There is one such machine per 23 inhabitants of Tokyo. It is a well-known fact that we are more likely to follow the suggestions and advice of friends rather than strangers – that we are more likely to buy things in places we know than in unfamiliar ones. However, there is a streak of curiosity and an urge to discover in each of us – regardless of cultural or geographical boundaries. The ‘Art Vending Machine’ offers art objects made by contemporary Polish artists and foreign guests. Come and get it – good art at great prices!